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Classification


USNM 48080

Geographic Distribution

Antarctic Convergence illustration Antarctic convergence

Bathymetric Specimen Dispersal

36 individual specimens found for Austrolaenilla setobarba.

Austrolaenilla setobarba (Monro, 1930)  Species

Original Description
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Original Description
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“Antinoë setobarba, n.sp.

St. 195. 30. iii. 27. Admiralty Bay, King George Island, South Shetlands. 62° 07' 00" S, 58° 28' 30" W. 391 m. Gear OTM. Bottom: mud and stones. One specimen.

The dorsal (Fig. 19, c) bristles are numerous and exceedingly fine capillaries, which appear to be quite smooth, but under a very high magnification minute serrations (Fig. 19, d) can be detected on one side of the blade.

The ventral bristle bundle is contained between two vertical lips, the anterior of which is produced into an extremely long cirriform process, almost reaching to the tips of the bristles. The ventral bristles (Fig. 19, e), although coarser than the dorsal, are very long and slender, and end in fine hair-like tips. They carry rows of delicate closely set teeth. The ventral cirri are short, just reaching to the lip of the chaeta sac. The example (Fig. 19, f) is a ripe female, filled with ova.

REMARKS. I find this specimen very puzzling. It was apparently obtained from the bottom of the sea, and the head and the sturdy character of the body are not those of a pelagic form : on the other hand, the large inflated-looking cirrophores and the long very delicate bristles recall the free-swimming species. Furthermore, I know no genus in which the bristles of both rami of the foot are fine capillaries, the dorsal almost smooth and finer than the ventral. I have provisionally attributed it to Antinoë on account of its ventral bristles, for I am unwilling to base a new genus on an incomplete specimen.

The example is full of eggs, and I think it very possible that it is undergoing some sexual change, involving the temporary adoption of the pelagic habit.”

(Monro. 1930)

Remarks

I find this specimen very puzzling. It was apparently obtained from the bottom of the sea, and the head and the sturdy character of the body are not those of a pelagic form : on the other hand, the large inflated-looking cirrophores and the long very delicate bristles recall the free-swimming species. Furthermore, I know no genus in which the bristles of both rami of the foot are fine capillaries, the dorsal almost smooth and finer than the ventral. I have provisionally attributed it to Antinoë on account of its ventral bristles, for I am unwilling to base a new genus on an incomplete specimen.

The example is full of eggs, and I think it very possible that it is undergoing some sexual change, involving the temporary adoption of the pelagic habit.

Specimens

Displaying 10 of 22 Specimens

Type Status Catalog No. Date Collected Location Coordinates Depth (m) Vessel
  48080 Images Available 2/11/1966 Antarctic Ocean 60.8° S, 44.23° W 192 – 188 Eastwind R/V
  75362 1/11/1972 Antarctic Ocean 62.96° S, 60.64° W 108 Hero R/V
  75363 1/26/1972 Antarctic Ocean 64.79° S, 64.12° W 107 Hero R/V
  75714 12/5/1971 Antarctic Ocean 65.8° S, 65° W 67 Hero R/V
  75715 12/7/1971 Antarctic Ocean 64.82° S, 63.54° W 100 Hero R/V
  75716 12/8/1971 Antarctic Ocean 64.82° S, 63.49° W 37 Hero R/V
  75717 12/16/1971 Antarctic Ocean 64.2° S, 61.09° W 101 Hero R/V
  75718 12/16/1971 Antarctic Ocean 64.2° S, 61.09° W 118 Hero R/V
  75719 12/16/1971 Antarctic Ocean 64.2° S, 61.09° W 118 Hero R/V
  75720 12/17/1971 Antarctic Ocean 62.94° S, 60.64° W 159 Hero R/V

Displaying 10 of 22 Specimens

View additional taxa  View all species collected at same locations as Austrolaenilla setobarba